“But everyone will be very, very surprised that he is of all people the Mashiach.”

natan-rabbi-rami-levy-end-of-days-ndeFirst, thanks to John Kelly Sartwell for bringing this story to my attention. It’s a very remarkable one, to say the least.

As 15-year-old secular Israeli boy named Natan had a near death experience on Monday, September 28, 2015 and returned to life describing Biblical prophecies about the End of Days.

In a video posted on YouTube, Natan is shown speaking to an Orthodox Jewish audience in a synagogue in Israel, just days after his near death experience. He relates his understanding of what was revealed to him in the next world during the 15 minutes that he was pronounced clinically dead.

Read more at https://www.breakingisraelnews.com/54425/following-near-death-experience-israeli-boy-returns-quoting-end-of-days-prophecy-video-jewish-world/#QbhMPwDMSQXfZE6V.99

According to the story, the young man in question doesn’t have any formal religious training and that his visions don’t come from a knowledge of the Bible. And according to this story, Susan Constantine, “a leading international expert on body language,” has studied the video and issued a written statement that in her “professional opinion the boy Natan truthfully believes he experienced a visitation in heaven and was not being deceptive.”

So the young man is being honest as far as we can tell. That, and the fact that he is being counseled by a non-Messianic Orthodox rabbi makes some of his statements even more interesting from a Messianic standpoint. To pick just a couple:

In describing the qualities of the messiah, Natan said, “The Mashiach (messiah) is first of all someone who can’t sin. Someone who repented. Who didn’t commit any transgressions. It can’t be that the Mashiach is someone who committed transgressions. Now it can be someone who we actually know very well. Lots and lots of people know him, according to what I understood. But everyone will be very, very surprised that he is of all people the Mashiach.” . . .

“I also saw that the moment Har haZeitim (Mount of Olives) splits into two, then the Mashiach will stand at the entrance, but he won’t…he won’t see who is religious, who has a beard and who a person is. What he will see is – he sees according to a person’s holiness, he will smell each person, he will smell if someone has holiness, if he is pure, if he did mitzvot (God’s commandments), if he performed acts of kindness. To see if he really has true fear of Heaven and not just fear of punishment, and things like that.”

That sounds like someone I know, actually.

untitledActually, as Rabbi Itzchak Shapira points out in The Return of the Kosher Pigthe idea of a perfect, Divine Messiah who would not judge by one’s outward orthodoxy but by the heart, and who would be initially rejected as “unclean” by the Jewish people before finally being accepted is one that traditional Judaism (particularly as informed by Kabbalah) has recognized over and over again through the centuries.

It’s fascinating that as we emerge from Israel’s time of punishment, the Holy One is connecting with ordinary Jews in extraordinary ways to prepare the way for the return of the King.

Shalom.

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4 Replies to ““But everyone will be very, very surprised that he is of all people the Mashiach.””

  1. Awesome! Thanks for sharing, This story should give us all encouragement that Messiah is opening the eyes of His people in these last days. This story is reminiscent of the one about Rabbi Kadduri, who supposedly revealed the name of Messiah just before he died.

    Like

  2. On the end of his story he say that its even a very huges sin to pick up the (smart) phone on the shabbat.
    According to weare the tipical Jew clothing it may be a point but it looks a very rabbine stuff.
    The story was very accomplice at my vision but now I have some doubts.
    Can it realy be such a great sin ?
    Must rabbines be still the same?
    Maybe it happend but have they adding some with it?

    Like

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